What TV executives believe about their audience

A few years back I was involved in redesigning a website for a TV channel in Sweden. What they told me gave me a profound insight into the minds of the networks. To bait your click, you won’t believe what they believe.
We met in a conference room in the networks main building. He was in charge of communications for several channels that belonged to the network. I was a junior employee at a highly regarded marketing agency.

We sat down, three of us from the firm, and the TV exec, to discuss what we would be doing. We began by offering a series of ideas about how they could communicate their unique brands and shows, but the exec stopped us half way though.

“No, no. You’ve got it all wrong.” he said “this isn’t why people watch our channel at all”.

We all leaned in. The exec launched into a vague pitch about what made them truly unique, summing it up in a phrase that is forever etched in my mind:

“People stay with our channel, for our programming

I was confused. I didn’t think he meant any coding was going on, but didn’t understand the term, thankfully he explained it. In the view of the network, people tuned into to a channel, and stayed with that channel, because of their unique arrangement of shows and commercials. The programming, is their term for the schedule of material broadcast. Each show, each commercial break and even the ads themselves, are scheduled to reflect the overall feel of the TV channel. This is, according to him, why people like one channel over another.

I was stunned by this. Not the information itself, I’ve always expected every media form to think like this to some degree, but by the thought that these executives actually believed that in the age of the internet.

This was prior to Netflix launch in Sweden, but anyone who had seen any statistics about video usage online, or seen anyone using youtube or torrenting a movie knew that this was completely false. Not just ignorant, but incorrect almost to the point of lunacy. People find and watch specific content because they like that content. They might endure everything else, only if there’s no easier way. But they do not choose their content by association.

I walked away from that meeting in a stunned silence.

Recently I think I have realized how this idea took shape. TV usage is measured by putting a box near your TV that records audio cues from the programs and commercials. This recorded data is later collected and aggregated to find statistically interesting patterns.

The problem, like with most statistics, is of course that this collection method cannot measure intent. So if you were to turn on your TV while you do the dishes, and talk on the phone, and then see one program before you go to bed, you will be measured as staying with one channel for quite some time before jumping to a specific show and then turning off.

Even though your intent was background noise while you do something else, the measurement is easily interpreted as you enjoying the channel and sticking to the programming.

For that network, or at least that executive, the numbers were clear. Their unique programming was what kept people glued to the TV screen five hours every night.

This is not a jab at TV, though they are aging rather badly, but a warning to all of us not to get caught forcing what we want users to think onto statistics, just because we believe our work to be important. Let’s never become so arrogant we start believing our brand is more important than our product. In the end, every business is about creating value for your customer.

(If anyone has similar insights into the TV industry, I’d LOVE to hear it. Please post in the comments below.)

2 thoughts on “What TV executives believe about their audience

  1. Even though this is a couple of years ago it clearly shows why tv channels are doomed. Would be nice to hear the same person’s voice on this today.
    Every time I try to watch commercial tv I’m surprised by the lack of imagination and improvements. TV shows coupled with a lot of commercials. And when there’s a movie you get 30 minutes including 2 commercials, then you get the news and weather report for 20 mins, before the movie continues.. Wow, just wow.
    I’ve got some beefs with on demand services as well but at least they’re more in line with modern audience.

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  2. Well if their goal is to retain their tech-limited seniors who can’t leverage steaming service….yeah. But for the internet part, they clearly came from another century. I haven’t watched TV since internet can give me what I want, not what the TV station wants me to see.

    Like

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