Getting rid of wish lists

I've been practicing minimalism for years. Slowly getting rid of things that I don't need. But I realized only yesterday that I'm hoarding clutter in my own head. Getting stressed for no reason. So I've decided to get rid of that stuff.

Yesterday I was talking to my friend Magnus about how he managed his reading list. You know, that list of books and articles you keep in three different places that always seems to grow? Those amazon wish lists that never seems to have a thing you want to read right now?

Well Magnus didn't have one, and that got me thinking.

I've been bookmarking all these books, articles, movies and TV-shows all over the place. But how much time am I actually spending enjoying things from these lists? To be honest, most of the time I stress about them and maybe once in a while I prune. So what is the point of keeping a list of musts when they were supposed to be entertaining?

This is the essence of minimalism. Your stuff ends up owning you. When you spend more time on upkeep of your stuff than on enjoying them. It becomes a ridiculous waste of lifetime.

So I'm getting rid of my lists. I will no longer store articles, I'll read them or disregard them. I'll no longer add books to lists. Either I want to read it now, or I'll come back when I feel like it. I'm not about to stop consuming media. Instead I'm going to consume what I want, instead of what I should want.

The goal is to get down to one or two things I'm reading. One thing I want to see next. The rest can wait.

There's never enough time as it is. Why the hell keep holding on to distraction?

Productivity porn

Conferences have interested me less and less over the last five years or so, and I just realized why. It’s because so much of it is inspirational instead of educational.

Inspiration is basically productivity porn. It’s entertaining and feels like you’re leaning, but it’s just another distraction. It’s the “busy work” of learning.

Stuff to keep you busy from doing what you really want to be doing.

You don’t need more inspiration. You need to do the work. Because doing things inspire us.

Secret advantages to being lean

Over the last few years I've transformed my body through weight lifting. I'm proud to say I've never been this fit and healthy.

Being strong and fit has a lot of advantages. But I would never have guessed being lean would make me enjoy shopping. As a very tall man most clothes still don't even nearly fit, but even clothes that don't fit look ok on me. 

This is not a humble brag, but a post about my genuine surprise.

I wonder if the past decades general weight increases might not be behind a lot of the mental anguish people today feel. Being lean removes a lot of problems, and saves you a lot of time.

 

Listening to the body

I am deeply suspicious of cross fit. While I work out with heavy weight, all the classic compound lifts, I’m deeply suspicious of any training that makes people needlessly tired. Now all training differs depending on your intended goal. So my own might be clouding my vision of other forms of training.

But we should always listen to our bodies. And inflammation, which all my runner and cross fit friends are so proud of constantly having, is a sign of doing something wrong. 

Inflammation is the body’s response to an injury or unnatural wear and tear. If you are regularly getting inflammation due to working out... it might be time to rethink your goals.

Motivation and leadership are passive qualities.

Sometimes I come across quotes and ideas by people that resonate so intimately I can't help myself but share them:

"You can’t motivate people. The best you can hope for is to inspire them with your actions. People who think they can use behavioral “science” or management techniques have not spent enough time on the receiving end of either."
— Leo Babauta (Zen Habits)

The science of motivation, and of fun, is quite clear on the subject. It's very easy to motivate someone who wants to do something. It's near impossible to motivate someone who doesn't want to. Which is why leisure and luxury sells well, while real fitness and learning looks stuffy and boring.

This is a moral question for designers. Because the easy design, the quick sell, will be motivating. It will also, quite probably, be the wrong thing to do.